Using AI-powered Speakers to Monitor Heart Health

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               Artificial intelligence has given the world many advantages over the years, from space travel to smart cars. Its next breakthrough is one of the biggest yet, the human heart. Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a new way to determine health issues with the heart and an utterly contactless manner. The current prototype built by academics at the university would use intelligent speakers to detect heart arrhythmias or irregular heartbeats and high blood pressure. It would be able to do it with almost the same accuracy as devices used in today’s hospitals. The studies and prototypes use things like Amazon Alexa devices, Google Home pods, and smart speakers usually used for music.

               The way the technology works is, the patient would sit a few feet in front of the speaker. Depending on how the pitch and resonance of the sound coming back from the speaker changes, the doctor can determine what the heart issue may be to proceed with the treatment as needed. It would also be able to detect breathing patterns as well. If this works, the National Institute of Health (NIH) would undoubtedly take notice. With this exciting innovation, doctors hope that the new technology will help quickly diagnose patients for years to come even further than the heart, possibly even the brain.

               These recent innovations in medical devices like the one Lenox Laser worked with the NIH in a study about protein sampling and delivery into the brain could help doctors prevent and treat diseases. To all those involved with this new study prototype, Lenox Laser would like to send our best wishes for a profound positive outcome. If you would like to read more about the study, click here for an article from ScienceDaily.

Imaging Polarimetry 2013 Study

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Imaging polarimetry is defined as the measurement and polarization of transverse waves, the biggest of all being electromagnetic waves such as radio or light. This is commonly achieved on electromagnetic waves reflected, refracted, or diffracted by material to characterize the object being used. However, the key question behind the 2013 study being conducted was how can light polarization be measured without moving the particles that make up the light itself? Remote sensors ended up being the hopeful answer to this question by putting them into an imaging polarimeter system. The new system proposed would use a prism.

Specially-fitted optical slits from Lenox Laser were used on the Pantera 6M8 camera onboard a triple-Wollaston imaging-polarimeter. It would be able to help measure the intensity of each polarization projection. The slits also help maintain spatial coherence along the x-axis of an object. This device would also help measure out certain materials and elements in finite detail previously unattainable before. The system also contains a 2-D telescope with a scanning optical relay system designed to study the many wavelengths of light.

With the device’s compact design, it had to be reliable and withstand many different environmental situations and still perform calculations as accurately as possible. The design also had to be practical to be loaded onto space shuttle missions and the like. 

Lenox Laser was very proud to be a part of this massive study. We are very grateful for this opportunity. To learn more about the optical slits that we offer, please click here, and if you would like to read more about the study, click here.