New Wearable Sensor for Saliva and Tear Production

In the medical industry today, many wearable health devices can help people track things like heart health, diabetes, exercise, blood pressure, and so much more. Heart monitors, fitness trackers, Smartwatches, eyewear, and even clothing are just some things that can allow consumers to track their health and well-being. Another handy device could be on the way, thanks to scientists at Penn State University. The device will monitor your health and administer needed medication to assist a patient’s saliva and natural tears. Most importantly, if approved, it would have to be a low-cost option for patients that want to use it. The device would also help manage and possibly detect certain diseases such as oral cancer and infections, oral ulcers, and many types of eye infections. The device functions by using a microneedle to effortlessly and safely deliver the correct dosage of any prescribed medication that the patient may need through the skin, eye, or tongue. This is achieved by micro to nano steel ports on the structure to deliver the medication even as deep as the patient’s individual cells in their body.

As far as Penn State’s involvement in this process, Professor Huanyu Chang in the Penn State Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics hopes to not only expand this potential miracle technology to other medical uses and applications, but he also hopes that it will be a beacon of hope for people in desperate need of relief from painful ailments. The data of different bodily readings could be readily displayed on a patient’s computer, tablet, or smartphone. Not only that, but the patient would have rapid, accurate results in the shortest amount of time possible.

While this exciting new technology is a long way from being perfected, it is hoped that it can be applied to many applications and devices, big or small, when it is it. The ability to quickly see test results and reading will allow doctors to diagnose and treat their patients much sooner than traditional methods.

If you would like to read more about the subject, please click here.

Update on The NASA Messenger

Courtesy of NASA

The NASA Messenger satellite was the seventh discovery mission ever launched by the company and the first-ever fly past Mercury. Its intended purpose was to study the geological environment of the planet as well as its surface. Several days ago, the systems on board the Messenger recorded a meteoroid striking Mercury’s surface. It’s estimated that it measured three feet in length. The Messenger expedition lasted from 2011 to 2015. The Messengers Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer helped capture the possible evidence readings and amounts of sodium and silicon ions within planets solar winds. The meteoroid would come from an asteroid belt some 200 million miles away from Mercury using the information from those particles.

Scientists could do a reverse time-lapse using the particles found in the solar winds and determined that the particles found were younger than initially thought. On the sun side of the planet, it was discovered that the particles were traveling in an extremely tight beam of light like a wave, all at the exact same time and speed. This allowed them to track the sun particles back to their source and found that a cluster of particles erupted on Mercury and scattered nearly 300 miles into the vastness of space. Powerfully charged gases also disperse from rays of light from the solar winds. Hypothetically maybe two or three impacts happened per year during Messenger’s mission lifespan. Unfortunately, none of those were captured in any of the images from the mission.

Messengers’ origins date back all the way from July 1999, when it was first selected as the seventh discovery satellite, to July 2001, when final construction began. August 2004 is when the mission launched. It completed flybys of Earth, Venus, and Mercury starting in August 2005 and ending with the Mercury flyby in September 2009. The satellite completed its mission in 2015. 

Space is a vastly endless sandbox of discovery for modern science. To all those working to discover greatness in space and beyond, Lenox Laser gives our thanks. To see a detailed timeline of the Messenger mission, please click here.

SpaceX Launch Updates – January 2021

All eyes were on the launch pad at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida this past Sunday for the second US East Coast launch of the Falcon 9 rocket this year for SpaceX. The mission, known as Transporter-1, was the debut for Space Flight Incorporated’s Sherpa-FX, a new transport vehicle. All the satellites launched so far will be used to create a massive network of internet connectivity for areas around the globe that don’t have local access to high-speed broadband. This will apply to both residential and business use, as well as a potential military application. The launch also gives SpaceX a world record for the most satellites ever launched at once, a total of 143. The network is being created aims to be one-of-a-kind. The launch also allowed the Starlink program to add an additional 10 satellites to its own growing network. On top of SpaceX’s launch of their own satellites, the company also has its Rideshare program. 

The SpaceX Rideshare program’s primary purpose is to get smaller satellite companies and developers a chance to get their product up into orbit and come one step closer to achieving their own vision. The range of companies covered with this program is already vast. Still, it could become more extensive as time goes on with military use, satellite radio, Internet, and TV. The growing number of successes that SpaceX has had over the last few months to last year does not stop here.  

It successfully launched its Dragon Crew mission on May 30 of 2020, which carried astronauts to meet up with the International Space Station for ongoing scientific research. On January 18, 2021, the Starlink program officially had its first batch of satellites launched into orbit, beginning to weave its ever-growing network of connectivity. Since June 2010, SpaceX has had 107 successful launches. 

From the SpaceX Dragon Crew mission to Starlink and Falcon 9, there seem to be no signs of slowing down for the company. With a massive 26 launches left to go in 2021, it is exciting to see the great potential on display. Space is an ever-evolving presence, and SpaceX continues to evolve along with it. The next launch is currently set for January 29 this year.  

If you would like to read more, click here for an article from Yahoo.com and here for another article  from Teslarati. 

Covid-19 Vaccine Distribution Update

Despite a recent vaccine breakthrough for Covid-19, new strains of the virus have been identified worldwide. News of the new mutations has heightened concern for healthcare workers worldwide. Still, they remain vigilant and confident that the current vaccine can battle the strain without issue. The Pfizer vaccine is in use in the UK, Europe, and the United States, with production expected to ramp up in massive quantities this year. Approximately 2 billion doses are expected to be available by the end of 2021. Pfizer has helped open six manufacturing sites to help meet demand. One area in Germany is expected to open in early February of this year. Other than the Pfizer vaccine, there is also the Moderna variation of the shot. Both versions of the vaccine needing two doses given 21 days apart to be fully effective against Covid-19.  

According to Dr. Anthony Fauci, herd immunity with Covid is undoubtedly possible. Still, it would require as many people as possible that can get the vaccine do indeed get it. For many states now, vaccine rollout will be in three phases. Phase I will be essential workers, first responders, and people over 65; the second phase is a high-risk population. The final step would be the entire remaining population of an area. Even though this rollout is slow to begin, any positive progress is good, and Lenox Laser is proud of the ongoing effort. 

If you would like to read more, click here

SpaceX Early 2021 Launch Highlights

               2020 was a great year of success for Elon Musk’s SpaceX program. For example, some of the things his company has launched in the past have been Dragon and XirusXM satellites. The new year of 2021 is expected to be of no difference in the measure of success. The first launch of a Turkish satellite intended to expand television services throughout Europe, the Middle East, and Africa was a magnificent success. It took place on Thursday, January 7. One of the company’s next missions is called Transporter 1, which will carry dozens of smaller satellites into orbit as soon as the week of January 11.

               Even this year, SpaceX has plans to launch even more. In the spring of this year, a four-man crew mission called Crew 2 will be launching to meet with the International Space Station, increasing the staff to seven. Two Russian cosmonauts and three American astronauts are already aboard the station. These accomplishments have been a dream for years for the US NASA space program. Another launching of a multitude of Falcon rockets is a plan for this year to expand an ever-growing satellite network to bring information to the masses. With the launch of more satellites planned and building more ground stations, the Starlink program plans to expand its reach even further. One of its big goals is to improve its network latency by 16 to 19 ms within 2021.

               2021 looks to be a big year yet again for SpaceX, with up to three crewed space missions planned. At Lenox Laser, we are just as excited about the wonderful potential impact that all this innovation on their part could have. We wish them the most tremendous success.

                If you would like to read more, please click here.

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