PDA, Deloitte, and the FDA: Training Partnership

The Parental Drug Association (PDA) has aimed to educate and expand knowledge of the pharmaceutical industry. They have once again made a great partnership that will grow its reach in the pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical fields. In February 2021, the PDA partnered with Deloitte Consulting and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to help pharmaceutical companies, both established and upcoming, understand compound drugs. The Parental Drug Association has prided itself on providing pharmaceutical and other drug-related workshops at large conventions worldwide. These conferences allow companies to attend, present, and learn from some of the top minds in medicine.

The aim is to provide further courses within the PDA’s conferences that would give new and growing information on environmental drug monitoring, aseptic monitoring of drug product sterility, and improvement on Corrective and Preventative Actions (CAPA). The conferences would also discuss how to improve and initiate new drug safety protocols. Lenox Laser has attended PDA conferences and workshops in previous years. 

Past conferences include the October 2019 conference in Gothenburg, where members of our team gave lectures and demonstrations about our products and personal involvement in the industry of pharmaceuticals. In 2020, Lenox Laser attended a PDA conference in Basel, Switzerland, and shared our knowledge on the stage. 

Lenox Laser provides pharmaceutical testing services such as Container Closure Integrity Testing (CCIT), CCIT positive testing controls, and CCIT related calibrated leaks. If you require similar services, request a quote today.

Lenox Laser is honored to work alongside the Parental Drug Association. We thank them for their contributions and efforts in the pharmaceutical industry. We look forward to attending future conferences and workshops. If you would like to read more about the new partnership between PDA, Deloitte, and the FDA, click here.

Dr. Charles H. Townes Speech – Revisited

Dr. Townes and the first maser

The human mind has given us some of the most outstanding achievements throughout history. As our thirst for knowledge and understanding continues to grow, new ideas are born. One of those great minds was Charles Hard Townes, the inventor of the maser, the precursor to the laser. Dr. Townes wasn’t just an inventor but also a patriot serving his country in war and a brilliant university professor. During World War II, he worked under Bell Labs as a radar technician in the hope that his expertise would turn the tables on the enemy. This effort would give birth to the shortest wavelength radar by seeing the effects of light on it. Upon returning from the Navy, he would lead a research team at Columbia University, where he and his team would study molecules.

After becoming a professor at Columbia, he and his dedicated students would design a molecule oscillator that would be endlessly argued over. From the discussion with his students, Townes and others arrived at their latest invention — the maser, Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission Radiation. Dr. Townes was an example that both patients and trial and error can lead to remarkable discovery and creation. In October 2010, Dr. Townes give a speech at Lenox Laser during our one of our light seminars entitled “How New Things Happen.” During the speech, he mentioned that ideas often happen by accident. Those accidents can involve a network of people. One’s patience can be rewarded in unexpected ways while still reaching your goal in the end.

Townes’s legacy and contributions to history remain greatly appreciated and never forgotten. Please visit the Industrial Institute of Optics to read or watch Dr. Townes’s speech in its entirety.

James Webb Update – Golden Mirror Test

               As the James Webb telescope launch on Halloween this year fast approaches, the project continues to make strides toward that day. From past achievements such as folding up and packing the massive tennis court size sunshield to testing the shield itself, the exciting project has made tremendous progress. The most recent milestone was the completed final testing of the telescope’s gold mirror. The mirror is precisely 6.5 m wide, and its purpose will be to reflect light back from galaxies and stars for further study on Earth. This test marks the final time the gold mirror will be checked before it is packed up and shipped off to the launch site. The tests have been conducted by Northrop Grumman, the team that is helping build James Webb. The mirror itself must precisely fold into the launch rocket without error or any form of damage. It consists of two wings folded up in an ongoing simulation conducted over the next several days. The final part of the mirror will be folded. Beryllium makes up the primary mirror in the telescope that cost $10 billion. Webb will use the received infrared light to take readings of the stars and galaxies, allowing humanity to see inside galaxies like never before. Several projects hope to be a part of James Webb in the first year of its operation as astronauts from over 40 countries have allocated time on the telescope.

               Lenox Laser had the honor of being part of the project by designing precision alignment targets for its mid-infrared instrument (MIRI). Lenox Laser was even invited to see this process firsthand when they were created. Given all of James Webb’s technology, it was designed so that no human is needed for repairs. Although if desperately needed, a piloted crew could be sent to perform repairs and come home from a short mission. James Webb will be the new premier space telescope for US outer space study if all is successful. Lenox Laser wishes the very best to all involved and extends a heartfelt thank you for allowing us to be a part of this monumental moment in history.

Courtesy of NASA and ESA/Hubble

               If you would like to read more, click here to read an article about James Webb’s final tests by MSN.

SpaceX and the Inspiration4

               SpaceX has done extraordinary things over the years, making a name for itself with several missions to study the universe. This September, they plan to make history again with a first-of-its-kind mission entirely made up of civilians. The four-person crew will be entering low Earth orbit for a 3-day duration. The targeted date for no later than September 15. The crew members chosen are geoscientist Dr. Sian Proctor who completed four previous NASA missions, former Air Force member Chris Sembroski who served as a space camp counselor working with Lockheed Martin and earned a degree in aeronautics from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Another member is 29-year-old Hayley Arceneaux, a bone cancer survivor and former patient of St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital. Hayley has a physician’s assistant degree and will also be the youngest person ever to travel to space. Hayley was chosen by St. Jude’s themselves to go on this civilian-only mission. The man behind this idea and the last member is Jared Isaacman, the billionaire CEO of Shift4 Payments. He will also serve as commander. Jared will give all money from this endeavor to St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital.

               Training for missions usually takes around two years, but for this Dragon crew, time is short. The training provided by NASA will be based on a NASA-approved curriculum. Given the mission only lasting three days, the team will not need to learn traditional spacewalks and station operations training. Isaacman plans to put the crew through their paces, testing them in isolated environments in close quarters. The mission will get to space using a retooled Falcon 9 rocket from past Dragon crew missions. With this mission being the first all civilian crew flight, it will set a record for history. None of the four people selected have past space experience but have worked with the government and other divisions. They will receive commercial-style training and be the first to complete a space mission with no government oversight. Isaacman could not be more thrilled partnering with SpaceX; with their past achievements, he knew that they were the right people for the job. For Hayley, being a part of this mission was a dream come true, and her family was happy to do anything to make it happen.

               This mission is extraordinary because not only does it give ordinary people a fantastic opportunity, but it also gives hope to the many people fighting cancer. For more information, please visit Inspiration4’s website. If you would like to read more about this, please click here for an article about it from MSN.

Potential for Microbial Life on Mars

Courtesy of NASA

When the Mars Perseverance rover landed on the planet in February, it astonished the world with detailed photos of the planet and audio of the surface. After discovering water and ice on Mars, the next endeavor starting the search for evidence of possible life and life-supporting properties on the planet. A new study conducted by the Astrobiology Journal concluded that there is indeed the right amount of ingredients to support microbial life. The study looked at the planet’s Martian meteorites and their chemical makeup. Observing the chemical reaction whenever these meteorites had continuous constant contact with water once the meteorites fell back to Earth.

Among the many reactions studied, Radiolysis was of massive interest. The reaction is created when radioactive elements like potassium uranium and thorium could be converted sulfates, so much so that they tap water. One of the reasons is that there’s water on the planet because there is a flowing lake somewhere on the planet in the subsurface. It is now believed that once the components of that lake are studied further, how microbial life could exist could possibly be revealed. Also, different wavelengths of light being investigated to potentially give way to a better understanding of Mars’s past.

Further study will be ongoing, but the full extent of the findings may not be known for some time. The idea of life on another planet could be an extraordinary mark left on history forever. We wish all the very best of luck to the teams in their search for answers.

If you would like to read more, please click here.

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