NASA Series: Hubble Space Telescope

It is said that a picture’s worth 1000 words. If that sentiment is true, then all the pictures taken by NASA’s famed Hubble telescope are priceless.  The Hubble telescope, named after the famed astronomer Edward P Hubble, launched on April 24, 1990 and was deployed the following day. Lenox Laser would become involved with the Hubble project in 1981.  Lenox Laser would provide custom slits for the Hubble instruments, as well as twice providing custom stainless-steel discs with crosses in 1989 and 1991.

Hubble Space Telescope, Image Courtesy of NASA

Lenox Laser would provide precision crosshair fiducials and slits. Fiducials can be any object placed in the field-of-view of an imaging system for a point of reference. They can be used in things such as medical imaging, physics, radiotherapy and geological surveys. Any time the Hubble telescope takes pictures of stars, planets, and galaxies, the subject of the photo can be moving past the telescope an estimated 17,000 mph.  Astronauts have made well over 1.3 million observations with the assistance of the Hubble since mission launch. The Hubble has an expected decay date anywhere between 2030 and 2040 according to Nasa mission data. As of 2019, it is still in active service for photos.

Five shuttle missions have repaired and serviced the Hubble, with the final shuttle mission taking place on May 11, 2009. We at Lenox Laser hope that Hubble continues to give humanity an awe-inspiring look at the vast scope and immense beauty in the galaxy with its estimated time left. May the light of infinite galaxies continue to guide the way to bold discovery, new paths uncharted, and boundless wonders that will inspire humanity to reach beyond the depths of our existence.

We hope that you will continue to follow Lenox laser more Nasa mission excitement!!

For more information on the Hubble Space Telescope follow the link below.

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/main/index.html

NASA Series: Messenger
NASA Series: Kepler Mission and the Starfield Plate