NASA and Aerosol Jet Printing

Through the years, there have been many different styles of printing, from newspapers on paper presses to photo printing and art design. With these techniques, the amount of ease using them continues to evolve. Aerosol jet printing is a method that allows contactless direct printing for mass manufacturing that uses inkjet technology to put materials on substrates. It is the process of coding a base material used as a foundation for the object or image being printed on material. This process would also aim to significantly reduce printing time and manufacturing costs for companies. Aerosol jet printing can allow fine detail printing of 10 µm for high resolution printing onto different types of hardware and electronics.

The technique is also being used recently by NASA with a combination of 3-D printing that can print electronics such as transistors, conductors, and even cell phone cases. NASA is using it to create motherboards with digital to analog converter chips. If successful, NASA could later use it to mass-produce and print hardware for their many spacecraft.

Non-particle ink such as silver ink would allow extraction of silver non-particles from 10 to 100 µm of extraction. The type of non-particle can also be determined by the metal material used, such as titanium, aluminum, alloy, steel, and more. The difference between inkjet printing and aerosol printing is that aerosol allows 2 to 4 times higher resolution than inkjet, print resolution, and ink viscosity. Aerosol also has a clone-resistant nozzle; inkjet does not; aerosol is more tightly focused on its direction when printing, whereas inkjet is random directionality. Inkjet is a single drop; aerosol can be continuous.

Lenox Laser was able to use our cutting-edge processes in laser drilling flow restrictive orifices to assist in these technological advancements in the field. The full potential of aerosol printing has yet to be realized. However, we at Lenox Laser very helpful for the future and happy to be a part of it.

If you would like to read more about this piece of news, click here for an article from 3DPrintingIndustry and here for an article from ResearchGate.

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